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What is the Process of Getting a Divorce in California


If you’re looking to get a divorce in California there are many important steps that you need to be aware of. A divorce attorney in San Diego can help guide you through these steps to help ensure that your divorce process goes as quickly and smoothly as possible. This article will explain the major steps that you need to take to obtain a divorce in California.

The Process of Getting a Divorce in California

Create the Divorce Petition and Sign It

The first step in the process of getting a divorce in California is to create a petition. This petition, also known as a summons, is the first way for you to claim divorce from your partner. The court will give you a case number on this summons so you can further proceed with it. Keep in mind that to file this summons you need to pay $435 for it. Also, at least either you or your partner needs to have lived in California for at least 6 months before you can apply for a divorce.

If your partner was the one who filed the summons report, you can sign it after reading it and if you approve of what is said in it. If you don’t want to sign the summons due to a disagreement with something in it, then be sure to use the services of a San Diego divorce lawyer to help you. They will work with you to change anything in the divorce papers that you feel is incorrect or unfair.

Sign a Custody Order

If you and your partner have kids, you will need to sign a custody order. This is also known as a “request for order”. This custody order will require you to disclose things such as your income. This is a good thing to sign when you start your divorce process because it will work to clear up any problems regarding this area in the beginning of your divorce. While it’s ideal that you work together and compromise with your spouse on this issue, sometimes this doesn’t always happen. If you feel like your spouse is taking advantage of this situation, then talk with a San Diego divorce lawyer about it.

Create Your Disclosure Declaration

The next step is to create a disclosure declaration for your partner. This is actually a legally required thing for you to do because it will show your spouse any possible problems that could be occurring that they don’t know about. This paperwork will disclose to your partner things like debts and assets that you have. You have 60 days to create a disclosure declaration and 60 days to sign it if your partner created it. However, if you feel that your spouse is forgetting to mention certain things in this, be sure to talk to a San Diego divorce lawyer about it.

Request Information From Your Spouse

After all of these previous steps are done, you need to then request information from your spouse. This is often called the discovery process. This is where you can ask your spouse questions and request information about certain things. The discovery process helps you to learn more about what’s going on in areas such as income and other financial aspects that you might not know a lot of information about.

Work to Complete Your Divorce

The next thing to do is to finalize your divorce. You can use a San Diego divorce lawyer to help you settle any court appearances and to help you quickly end your marriage. They will help you prepare the right paperwork for your divorce to help your court appearance go smoothly.

Officially End Your Marriage

After you have signed the correct paperwork and have completed the needed steps above, you can work to officially end your marriage. A San Diego divorce lawyer can help you set up a court appearance date to legally end it.

These are the official steps of getting a divorce in California. However, there are many different legal aspects to keep in mind in addition to these. Also, sometimes your spouse might not be as cooperative with your divorce as you might like them to be. This can add additional steps to your divorce process. This is why it’s best to use the services of a San Diego divorce lawyer who will help you to obtain a divorce quickly.


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